Duchamp’s Green Box

In Sirc’s essay “Box Logic,” he develops a method for writing with technology out of Duchamp’s Green Box, a collection of personal notes that functions like a prose catalogue, a collection of statements, notes, and sound-bites that make a workable larger structure.

Duchamp’s The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Green Box) (1934) is a limited edition of notes on scraps of paper that details Duchamp’s own invention process during the conception and execution of his work The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass) (1915–23).

 

The Large Glass

The Large Glass

The Large Glass is oil, varnish, lead foil, lead wire, and dust executed on two glass panels, combining chance procedures and planned studies on perspective. (It’s in the Philadelphia Museum of Art for those going to RSA.)

The Green Box contains 94 individual items that Duchamp called “facsimiles,” mostly hand-written notes from 1911 to 1915. Duchamp “published” 320 individually produced copies of the green cardboard cover, one color plate, photographs, and the ninety-four notes, each printed and torn up to match the borders of the scribbled originals. For Duchamp, The Green Box was an extension of The Large Glass more than an exposition on it.

The Green Box

The Green Box

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